Other Programs & Electives

We're excited to offer other programs & classes that are outside our core On-Camera Training Program. Some of these classes are on-camera specific, some are not. See particular class description for details. Our stable of electives offered changes frequently. Check back often! Not all classes that are listed on this descrption page are offered each term- see schedule for classes available curently.

Monologue Boot Camp 

with Steven Ivcich
Actors seldom make the most of monologue auditions. It’s not for lack of trying. It’s for lack of a process that helps them find, develop, and perform great monologues. Monologue Boot Camp is all about process.
  • Identify monologues that are right for you.
  • Understand how monologues function in the audition environment.
  • Learn a developmental process that can be applied to any monologue.
  • Get coaching that speaks directly to your individual needs.
  • Adapt your monologues for on camera auditions
In Monologue Boot Camp actors are assigned a monologue chosen specifically for them by instructor, Steven Ivcich. You’re able to track your development via in class video that can be downloaded between classes from the Green Room site. Steven Ivcich is a director/writer/actor/teacher with more than 30 years of professional experience in theatre and media. To review his approach to monologues visit Steven’s blog, theactorsprocess.com.

Green Room Professional Program (GRPP)

with Steven Ivcich
The Green Room Professional Program is a three-level intensive actor-training program. While our popular On-Camera Training Program was designed to provide actors with technical and stylistic expertise in the on-camera audition, Green Room Professional targets the core skills that drive great performances both on camera and on stage. GRPP is specifically designed for actors intent on raising their skills to a true professional level. GRPP training is based on an approach that encourages each individual actor to define a unique working process that expands expressive range, improves creative agility and delivers consistently high levels of performance. In short, GRP explores every skill set essential to a professional acting career. Expert coaching from GRP director, Steven Ivcich, insures the continuity of the training and brings personalized attention to each actor’s development.
 
Level 1 establishes core performance skills that effect every audition, every rehearsal, every performance. You learn to effectively engage your audience no matter what the performance venue. Expansion of physical, vocal and emotional range reveals unrealized personal potential. Understanding how the performance environment really works brings clarity to your process and improves your ability to take direction. Practical application to auditions, cold reading and scene development means that you’re learning skills that can be immediately applied in the real world. Level 1 is an intensive 4-week class that meets twice a week. 4 hours on Sundays and 3 hours on a weeknight evening.

Level 2 expands Level 1 performance skills into characterization, script exploration, structuring a performance and working actor-to-actor. Through scene work, Level 2 GRP actors refine their personal process and learn to apply that process to role development whether that’s prepping for an audition or sustaining weeks of performance in a feature film. Level 3 is a “process” proving ground. Each individual actor’s skills are tested through scene assignments that drive process exploration and expand casting range with challenging roles that take you into new creative territory. Level 3 can be taken multiple times affording an ongoing workspace for GRP actors.

An Experienced Teacher, Steven Ivcich is director and lead teacher of the Green Room Professional Program. He is a writer/director/actor/teacher with 35 years of professional stage and film experience. Working with actors has been central to the arc of his career. His understanding of the actor’s creative needs led him to create a training process that affords actors a highly stimulating workspace.

GRPP Admission
Level 1 is an open admission class. No audition is required. Admission to Levels 2 and 3 is based on performance in the previous level.

GRPP Class Schedule
Levels 1 & 2 are 4-week intensive classes that meet twice a week (7 hours weekly). Level 3 is an 8-week class that meets once a week (3 hours weekly). See the home page for scheduling of GRPP Levels currently being offered. Tuition
Cost for GRPP levels 1 & 2 is $385. However, if Levels 1 and 2 are taken back-to-back Level 2 is discounted to $285 for the 4-week intensive. Level 3 is $285 for the 6 week class.

To find out if GRP is right for you. Arrange to visit a GRPP class by contacting Steven Ivcich. Read Steven’s ongoing commentary on a wide range of topics relating to the art and business of acting at http://theactorsprocess.blogspot.com/

FAQ- "Which Program should I take??"

Energy and Creativity

For 20 years David Murphy has worked in the field of acting. Beyond his acting and voice over credit, he has been a casting director, theatre director and instructor. What is not as widely known is his credential as a Reiki Master. Reiki is a healing modality using energy. More often than not, an unfocused energy can be at the root of an uncreative and uninteresting performance. Have you ever had a poor audition and wrote it off as having been nervous, or simply not "on" without exploring further what was at the root of the problem? If you are willing to fearlessly take a leap into a unique class of self-reflection, energy work and discovery of higher creative self, this will be right up your alley. There will be group exercises and group discussions, as well as individual scene work using scripted pieces and improvisation. Bring a VHS tape, although not all work will be done on-camera.

The Cold Read: Everything, All At Once, Right Away.

The Cold Read-- certainly one of the most crucial tests an actor can undergo, while simultaneously one of the most unfair. With no connection to what will be the final product, what could an unmemorized and unprepared scene/monologue possibly communicate to a director? The answer: nothing, and everything! The cold read is the culmination of everything you know about acting, concentrated into five white-knuckle minutes that can mean the difference between the role or the scrap heap. You need to take that step into the unknown with confidence and clarity. While this six-session class will touch on many of the basics of acting, the ultimate goal will be to apply your personal strengths to brand-new texts in real-time exercises. This is Extreme Acting taught by Lance Baker- one of Chicago's most adventurous actors!

Teens Acting On-Camera (Limit 10 students)

Work in a classroom setting with other teens on roles written for teens.
  • Learn how to analyze a commercial script.
  • Strengthen your business and communication skills as you discover what is expected of you.
  • Learn how to use and develop your own personality.
  • Work towards “keeping it real”.
  • Incorporate tips and tricks that many actors overlook.

One-On-One Coaching

We are pleased to offer one-on-one coaching. We prefer to work towards particular goals that the actor has made a point of exploring.
Availability may be limited.

For info call 312-685-2774, or email us.

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Recent Blog Posts

By: Courtney Rioux

Courtney’s first day as EMT #1.

As a recurring character on a network television show and an acting coach, I get a lot of emails from people asking what they can expect from their first day on set for an episodic.

I remember my first day on a network TV set, as “EMT #1” on Chicago Fire. I was excited, but mostly nervous. It was a hot Saturday in July. Most people I knew were at Lollapalooza and I was on 290 in an ambulance.

At lunch, I was eating alone and my background EMT partner sat at another table alone. I called him over. He told me he wasn’t allowed to talk to “1st team”, which is why he didn’t automatically sit by me. It wasn’t my first time on set ever, but it felt like it and I could have used some company. I hope I can shed some light for you here on a day in the life on set, so you can be less nervous than I was on day one.

The night before, you’ll get a call time from the Key 2nd AD (assistant director). Don’t ask your agent about your call time. They won’t know. This is because your call time depends on when the crew is wrapping for the evening before your shoot. They need 9-12 hours of turnaround time from one day to another (depending on actors and crew turnaround times.)

When you get on set, find the 2nd AD and get their name. They’ll sign you in and get you to your trailer/honeywagon. There you’ll read, sign and take a picture of your contract. Make sure your rate, your name and everything is correct. If not, reach out to your agent or SAG-AFTRA.

If your name is incorrect, that’s how it will show up in the credits of the show. If your rate is scale, check and see that there’s a + 10% for your agent. If not, your agent can’t take money out of your scale pay. Look out for them, too. If it’s above scale, they’ll take the 10% out of your pay, or have your agent negotiate 10% on top of your above scale pay.

Always take a picture of your contract and keep it for future reference! Don’t feel rushed. You’ll have time.

Get dressed in your trailer. They’ll call you to hair and makeup so you’ll be ready to head to set for rehearsals. First you might have a private rehearsal for the actors, director, DP (director of photography), script supervisor, and writer. There will definitely be a marking rehearsal for the crew. After that you’ll get wired (your mic) and sit around to wait until the crew sets up the shot.

You’ll be on 1st team, and they’ll use a 2nd team (stand-ins) to get lighting and shots set up.

On set, the director and the 1st AD will be running the show and giving you direction. The script supervisor will let you know if you’re getting your lines wrong. Make sure you’re matching up where you say your lines on each shot. This will help in the editing room.

There will be a lot of “hurry up and wait”. You’ll film your scene from multiple angles and shots with lots of set up in between for the crew. We get paid to sit around and wait!

SAG-AFTRA actor, Ilyssa Fradin, is often asked how long an actor will be on set for the day. She says to expect 8-12 hours. Just come prepared. Bring your chargers for your electronics, some work and reading materials. Fradin recommends bringing your own food in case you can’t get to Craft Services or have specific nutritional needs or food allergies.

My advice to you is to know your lines and your mark, and LISTEN!

Have a good attitude. Have fun and be yourself, but read the room. Know when to talk and when to stay quiet. Take direction and listen to everything being said to you and around you. When the director yells cut, go closer (but not too close!) to the conversations if you can.

Nicole McGovern, 2nd 2nd AD (no, that’s not a typo) on Chicago Med says, “Observe what’s happening. Be self-aware, but not in the way.” McGovern also says to be prepared for anything. Scenes get changed and moved to different days. “If you’re working multiple days, we may add another scene if we are ahead of schedule. A set may not be ready or an emergency may come up.”

When someone tells you their name, listen, say it out loud back to them, and write it down so you remember it next time you see them. Get a call sheet and study the names of the crew. They are making you look and sound good. They are awesome. Be friends with them. Thank them for their hard work!

Be aware of where the cameras are at all times, but of course don’t look into them.

Be prepared, but flexible.

Be willing to fail, and be willing to succeed.

Know that one mistake will not get you fired. Let it go, take a deep breath, and fix it in the next take. I can’t tell you how many times I thought I’d never be called in again, and four years later, I’m still there!

Don’t stop acting until someone yells cut, even if you think you’ve messed up and you want to start over. Keep going unless you’re told differently. They might be getting someone else’s coverage, and don’t need your lines to be right in that take. Keep going!

Never leave set without telling anyone. Find a PA (production assistant) or a 2nd AD and let them know where you’re going (ie: your trailer, the bathroom, to makeup etc). If you’re going to the bathroom, just ask, “Can I 10-1?” They’ll know what you mean.

If you’re like me, you’re probably worried you don’t know what you’re doing. No one really does his or her first day on set. Just pay attention to the veterans and learn on the job.

Sean Bradley, SAG-AFTRA actor and owner of The Green Room Studio says, “You don’t need to know everything. Feel free to ask questions.”

McGovern agrees, “You can ask the AD’s or PA’s questions. You might think it’s a stupid question, but it’s probably not.” (Fear not, there are a ton of PAs whose job it is to take care of you like you are a baby.)

Bradley adds, “Stay away from the dessert table. It’s a dangerous drug that will make you very sleepy for the rest of the day.”

Speaking of energy for the day, I always meditate beforehand. It helps me stay calm when action is yelled. I’m more focused and relaxed, and I find it helps me be best self in a stressful time. Need a guided meditation? Reach out to me and I’ll send one!

Finally, one of the stars on Med gave some great advice to a day player the other day. She was telling him there was food available for the cast and crew. She told him to go get a container and put it in his trailer before the food was gone. Then she yelled as he was leaving, “Act like you belong!” The first few times you are on set, you might not feel like you belong. You do. Act like it. Don’t be a jerk, but act confidently. You’re worthy of being there. Like the old saying goes, “Fake it ‘til you make it”!

And at the end of the day, find your 2nd AD who signed you in and sign out properly!

You got this!!

Check out our latest video in the series now!

We’ve just launched our new series of videos about The Acting Business in Chicago!
…where we will explore all sorts of business aspects of the acting world to help actors make more informed and strategic decisions – both in their business decisions AND in their audition performances.

We’ll release a new video each week. The first video is an introduction to the series- and the educational info starts next week – – so subscribe to our newsletter now!. Upcoming topics include:

– How the commercial business is structured
– How Casting Directors Prep the auditions for commercials
– How the actual commercial audition process works
– How the Prep for a TV & Film audition differs from commercial
– How the actual TV or Film audition process works
– Who’s the best talent agency in town
– Headshots
– Resumes
– Marketing
– Unions
– Bookings
…. and loads more!!!

Here’s the video below, and check us out at www.thegreenroomstudio.tv and sign up for our newsletter now!

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